The Ohio State University
Columbus, Ohio

CCCT A575-577 Pass-Through

This project consisted of the renovation of rooms A575 and A577 to allow implementation of a revised scope cleaning process for the Endoscopy Department.  The devices being cleaned in this area are nasal-pharyngeal scopes.  The project installed a pass-through window between the two rooms.

Room A575 consisted of the removal of existing sink & eyewash, nurse call, and telephone. A new 3-bowl stainless steel sink, stainless steel shelf, and hand-held hose type emergency eyewash was installed. 

Room A577 consisted of the removal of a sink on the north wall, and relocated a base cabinet from the west wall to the north wall.  Water and electrical services were provided for a new scope-cleaning machine (Medivators Advantage Plus) on the west wall.

Supply and exhaust air flows were rebalanced in both rooms to maintain negative pressure in Room A575 with respect to surrounding rooms, and to maintain positive pressure in Room A577 with respect to surrounding rooms.  The HVAC changes were made in compliance with the 2014 FGI Guidelines for Design and Construction of Hospital and Outpatient Facilities, AAMI ST79, and AAMI ST58.

Emergency power was provided for the Medivators Advantage Plus Endoscope Reprocessing System and other supplemental sterilizers.


Dorothy Davis Heart & Lung
Institute and Morgue Cooler Back-up System

This Multiple Prime delivery method project consisted of the design and construction of a 110,000 sq. ft. research facility of six stories plus basement to house a large auditorium, laboratories, extensive research facilities, meeting rooms, animal rooms, and six-story atrium. The project began with a site study to determine the best location for the facility relative to existing University Hospitals. The final location was the site of Upham Hall, which was demolished as part of this project. 

In 2014 Monks Engineers was engaged to enhance the Morgue Cooler System. This project consisted of a sequence of controls for a backup system of the morgue cooler at the Dorothy Davis Heart & Lung Institute. A new condensing unit was installed as was a DDC temperature sensor to monitor the temperature inside the body cooler and automatically provide cooling if the primary system failed.

Our Original Design of the MEP Systems

The plumbing system included storm and sanitary sump pumps, waste piping with acid dilution basins, distilled water generators, de-ionized water system, vacuum pump and piping system, and film processor piping. 

The HVAC system included two 400-ton water chillers, three high pressure air handling units, and a complete VAV system throughout the building. Fume hood and general laboratory exhaust was manifolded and exhausted through four induced dilution fans on the roof. Variable frequency drives were used on air unit fans, cooling tower fans, and some of the pumps. A DDC control system provided automatic control of the exhaust and supply air to each laboratory area as well as the entire HVAC system. 

The electrical system consisted of two double-ended substations, one rated at 3,500 amp (with two 1000 KVA, 13.2 KV//208V/120V transformers) and one rated at 2,500 amps (with two 13.2 KV//480V/277V transformers). The power distribution system consisted of two motor control centers, eighty-eight panels, and an emergency generator with associated automatic transfer switch. Fifty-one different styles of lighting fixtures were incorporated in the design as well as an extensive fire alarm system, communications and data systems, audio/visual system for the auditorium, nurse call system, dimming system, and animal watering control systems.


Doan Hall Labor & Delivery

In order to house the expanded labor and delivery unit, this project consisted of completing a 20,000 sq. ft. shelled-in space and renovating 10,000 sq. ft. of existing hospital space. Special attention was given to the design of the labor and delivery rooms to make the birth experience more pleasant for women and their families. We did this while accommodating the leading-edge technology available at The OSU Medical Center. Hotel-like in appearance with maple walls and flooring, each room provides a private bath, entertainment center and additional amenities to enhance the hospital stay. Curved gypsum board and cove lighting are combined to reinforce the non-institutional look and feel for the rooms.  

  Each patient room is sized to accommodate the specialized equipment, gases and other items that could be needed during the birth process. Any room can be immediately converted to handle an emergency procedure, if necessary. Staff efficiency and patient care were important factors in developing the design of the Doan Hall Maternity Center. Caregiver stations are located between each patient room, allowing staff to be more mobile and patient focused.

The project included the creation of rooms for labor and delivery, outpatient testing, triage, recovery and support functions. This project followed our other projects in this building including the original ‘in-fill’ of Doan Hall which created the 6th floor shell space for this project and the 4th floor Surgical Intensive Care Unit Project.


Doan Hall B088, B130C, 025M

The Ohio State University conducted a renovation of Doan Hall at the OSU Medical Center.  The project scope provided for the treatment of water entering the building.  

This project consisted of the procurement and installation of two (2) electrochemical type Chlorine Dioxide Generators to treat the domestic hot water systems serving Doan Hall.  The generators connect to existing domestic hot water and hot water return piping located in the vicinity of the existing hot water generators in rooms 0021M and W194M.  Scope of work included the installation of electrical and plumbing connection points for installation of chlorine dioxide generators, installation of Reduced Pressure Principle (RP) backflow prevention devices on existing incoming domestic hot and cold water services located in Rooms 0088 and X55C, and the installation of master thermostatic mixing valve station in Room 0021M.